Glasgow transport museum Part 2

Second part of the Glasgow transport museum tour.

Slowly it has dawned on me I might have found the part of photography I like the most. People say look at the bigger picture, I think I prefer to show the smaller part of the bigger picture. Everyone’s seen the bigger picture but the small things in life pass us by!

Camera: Canon 1D Mark III
Lens: Canon EF 24-105 L IS USM
All indoors photos:
Aperture: F4
ISO: 3200
All outdoors photos:
Aperture: F4 or F8
ISO: 200

Description are below the photo to first give you chance to decide for yourself what it might be.

IMG_1109Easy one, a train lantern.IMG_1119Front of the train with the lantern. IMG_1128The side of a tram.IMG_1141A classic truck radiator and radiator cap.IMG_1149Norton motorcycle.
IMG_1126Fire engine’s pumps.

Now the outside of the Glasgow Transport museum.
Small conclave on the right hand side of the building.
IMG_1301Love the way the angle of the connecting plates draw your eyes to the roof and onwards to the sky.
IMG_1320Just had to take this photo. IMG_1293Another excellent example of the brilliant art around the building. This is the bicycle racks.IMG_1319This is a curved window, see if you can make out the landscape reflected.IMG_1307
If you are ever in Glasgow made a point to visit the museum. In part 3 I will show you the Glenlee which is moored behind the museum.

Photographs by Jacques…

 

 

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Glasgow transport museum Part 1

I have visited the museum a few times and always find new things. The more I visit the less I look at the bigger picture and get pulled into small details of the huge machines and building. As I look at each photo I feel my eyes being ‘forced’ into certain direction depending on the shapes in the photo.

This is Part 1 of a possible 3 part post.

Canon 7D was used. ISO was mostly 800, Aperture of F4 or F5.6 were used.

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The last 3 photos were taken with my Canon 1D Mark III with the ISO pushed to 3200 and aperture of F5.6.
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Photographs by Jacques …

Forth bridges at night – Night photography II

Night photosession at the Forth road and train bridges.

We haven’t been out for a while for a night photo session. After days of snow, rain and cloudy weather it was time to get out and get some photos done.

I used my Canon 1D Mark III with my new Canon 24-105 mm F4 L IS lens for this session. I think need to invest in a wide angle lens for photos like these in the future. At 24mm I didn’t get the whole of either bridges in the photos. Time to do some homework to see the best wide angle lens to use. I started at F22 to see how hard I can push it last night and settled on F10 with either 30 seconds, 15 seconds or 10 second exposure.

The wind plays such a big role in night photography. The photos looks great on the camera but once you get it on a large computer screen you can see what the wind has done to your ‘near perfect’ focus. Editing the photos afterwards gives you another level to change things if you aren’t 100% happy with the results.

It was great fun and I think I prefer night photography over day time. So much to do at night to force you to try new things to get the best out of the light and subjects. The best part of all is you can take almost anything that would be boring in daytime and transform it at night, having a famous and brilliant subjects like these on my doorstep is a extra bonus.

Forth bridges:

Probably the photo of the evening for me.

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A few photos at different angles and spots of the train bridge.

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A train decided to add some extra effects to the long exposure. Other than that it’s the same image as the 1st one.IMG_0405

I tried to cut the spotlights out to get a better image of the bridge, didn’t work to the extent I hoped but not that bad either.IMG_0396

One of the best scenes of the evening for me.

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The road bridge at low tide.

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From below the road bridge.

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I hope you like these photos, I really enjoyed taking them.

Photographs by Jacques…